Summer Reading Recap…just in time for the first day of fall!

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Back in June, I wrote about the books I hoped to read over the summer, and for the first time ever (I think), I read every one. Usually a few get forgotten or replaced. A lot of my summer reading could be described as “light”–meaning that in the first ten days of summer I think I read five books. Many were page-turning mysteries, and without the pressure of an alarm clock in the morning, I often read well into the night, falling asleep with a book on my face.

I spent a lot of time in the Midwest, visiting family and friends in Ohio, and travelling around the perfection of northern Michigan with dear friends. My problem was finding adorable independent bookstores in every town I went to (Glen Arbor, Traverse City, Petoskey, Harbor Springs) was my limited ability to pack the books into my carry-on to get them home! I think I walked away with 3 new books from northern Michigan. I was able to get out to eastern Long Island to soak up the beach with family for a few days–and being from a family of readers, covered some serious pages oceanside.

Since the fall has (almost) started, I’m ready to jump into a reading life that feels a bit more weighty–there are so many great books that have been published recently. But here are my summer highlights, if you are looking for your next book:

Mysteries: These were mostly escapist reads–none quite living up to my personal standard of Tana French, but enjoyable nonetheless.

The Girls by Emma Cline, My Sunshine Away by M.O. Walsh, You by Caroline Kepnes, Before the Fall by Noah Hawley, Still Life by Louise Penny, The Lake and the Lost Girl by Jacquelyn Vincenta, The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

Memoir: I think I need to add more memoirs to my to-be-read pile, because I have been loving this genre.

The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui: This graphic novel was an impulse buy from The Strand one night that shares the story of the author’s family’s immigration from Vietnam to the United States. Reading stories like this is so vital to broadening our perspectives and finding common humanity. Definitely worth reading.

I’m Supposed to Protect You from All This by Nadja Spiegelman: I’ve read quite a bit of Spiegelman’s dad’s work (Maus is a graphic novel telling the story of his family during the Holocaust), but knew very little else about him. His daughter’s book was an engaging, thought provoking memoir about the relationship between mothers and daughters–I read it in two days.

Fiction:

Tender by Belinda McKeon, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty, Bittersweet by Stephanie Danner, Father’s Day by Simon Van Booy, The Seventh Book of Wonders by Julia Baggott

Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese: I have no idea how I missed this book when it was published in 2010, but it shot to my top ten books of all time and has become the book I most recommend. Set mostly in Ethiopia, it is a story of two twin brothers who grow up in an adopted family of medical professionals. It is about family, about medicine (and access to medical practices), about love, about loss. If you read one book from this list, this should be it.

Small Mercies by Eddie Joyce: This book tells the story of an Irish-Italian family from Staten Island from around the time the Verrazano Bridge went up until present day, that is partially centered around the loss of one of the sons, a firefighter, on 9/11. It’s told from the perspective of different members of the family, and just felt so honest and human. I wasn’t ready for it to end. 

Here I Am by Jonathan Safron Foer: More than a decade ago, I read Foer’s first two novels and loved them. He hasn’t written much fiction since (though reading Tree of Codes with a couple friends was amazing), so of course I was excited to read Here I Am, and better yet to read it with 3 friends. It could not be more different than his first two novels, which for me felt full of hope. Cynical is the word that kept coming to mind–which I guess isn’t that rare of a mindset shift from one’s early twenties to early forties? One I hope to avoid, but realistic? It was tough to get through at points, reading about the un-doing of the main character’s family as the oldest son is about the celebrate his bar mitvzah, but really interesting to discuss. He asks a lot of questions about what it means to be Jewish in the United States, after a mid-book plot curve that involves an international incident in Israel.

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